Working on Ruth’s letters

I unbundled all of Ruth’s letters and listed them by date, which you can see here. They stop in July 1942, but still, it’s a good sized list. I started scanning them, well one of them, and then I thought about taking my printer/scanner out to the garage to look for the sledge hammer, because you have to fight to get it to keep your scanning settings.

 

Cleaning up the Blog Posts

I’ve been going through all my blog posts over a period of time, deleting ones that no longer fit my vision for the project, and editing or adding dated comments to a few. I should have noted how many there were when I started. Oh, well, there are 98 now with this one.

I have very slowly been adding transcriptions of Ruth’s Letters. I have nothing else to say about that except that I have sure come to detest scanning. 🤷‍♀️ There are four page drafts waiting for me right now to finish. The last letters I posted were in February of this year.

As I mentioned long ago in a blog post, the nature of blog sites is that followers only get notified of new blog posts, like this one. When I add another transcription page, no one is notified. Readers must, for example, go to the page for Ruth’s Letters and see if any letter dates have turned into links. It’s a bad system for readers.

Ruth’s Letters

After finishing transcribing all 359 of Walt’s letters, I fell into a winter slump. Let’s call it a vacation. I’ve crept back into transcribing by working on those two pilot logs (log1, log2), and now I’m starting on Ruth’s Letters by scanning them and filing them into folders—I hate that part.

Walt mentioned a few times that he was returning her letters for the scrapbook she planned to work on (but never did). Most of her letters were bundled into envelopes, except for four that were returned to her in their original envelopes. She might have picked those up when she went out to visit him. The last bundle is dated 26 July 1942. Walt doesn’t head out to Texas until November, so it’s unclear why the returning ended in July. Nevertheless, that’s all there is. Walt and Ruth would be together after December, so there was no need for letters in 1943. The war obviously made it unlikely that Walt could return any letters received overseas. Beyond that, I don’t know what happened to the idea of the scrapbook, even though there is a large one with photos of other soldiers in it.

My scanning plan is to scan all of an envelope’s contents into one PDF. For the transcribing, though, I’ll do that one letter at a time, with each letter page in JPEG format. Bear with me.

While there is nothing new to read, imagine me scanning and organizing.

What’s After the Letters?

Currently, there are 402 pages on this site. The blog itself is one continuous page, and then there are title pages and resource pages, and so on.

Three hundred fifty-nine of those pages are letters from Walt—359!

::deafening applause::

But that’s not the end. I still have those packs of Ruth’s letters to be sorted and scanned and transcribed. They are without their envelopes, so I am hoping each one is dated, and that maybe they were returned in order. I will start by scanning and posting them before I do any transcribing, though.

There are other items that might be of interest, such as Walt’s pilot’s log book, and of course documents from the government following his death.

Stay tuned to the blog for updates about where the site goes from here.

Saving some old pictures

My mother, using the old image-cropping tool of scissors, cut up a bunch of one-of-a-kind photos and made a collage, using some kind of adhesive that no longer holds—that’s kind of a good thing, because they just come apart without tearing the edges of photos under them. One picture at the bottom edge didn’t make it, and I don’t know what it was or when it fell out.

collage

 

This grouping contains, among others, the only photo I’ve ever seen with me and my father in the same picture, so I’ve decided it’s time to get them all apart and scanned (maybe not those ones of me in the teen years). Then what should I do? Should I put the originals back in this arrangement in a frame? Or should I store them in a photo box? I kind of like things to be used rather than hidden away in boxes, even if it leads to their demise, so I’m leaning toward putting it all back together, once the scanning is done. Maybe I can even find another picture to fill in that empty spot, some embarrassing picture of my brother, for example.

A few of the photos can be seen on the 1951 page, showing some of the people talked about in the letters from Korea.

13 July 2020: Currently the poor photos, some loose, are in a drawer in my buffet. Recently, I decided I better find some glue or tape and put them back together in the frame before I fall victim to the coronavirus. I don’t think I am going to find time to scan them all, but it was a nice idea.