23 January 1942

A transcript follows the letter images.

Transcript:

Jan. 23, 1942.

Dearest Walt,

Well I laid awake last night until I thought of what it was I wanted to tell you. It wasn’t important, but rather interesting.

Yesterday, Mother & I saw Mrs. Haller, Jack Roth’s mother, down town. Of course, Mother asked her to tell Jack to give back my ring. She said O.K. She said Jack had been sick. His sister was pregnant and she got toxin poisoning & almost died. They saved

[verso page 1]

her, but lost the baby. Sometimes we don’t know how lucky they we are until we see how others suffer. She said Jack gave her a pint of blood & just recently had his tonsils out. I don’t suppose I’ll ever get the ring back, though.

I’m sitting here eating potato chips & getting thirsty.

When you get your uniform, you simply must send me a picture of you. Bet you’ll look swell.

-2-

It was sweet of you to write to that guy’s mother. (The one who can’t read & write.) Whenever he wants another letter written, you can skip a letter to me, honey. His mother is probably worried & I know she will be more than grateful to you.

I wrote to Mary Jean over a week ago & I haven’t heard from her yet. I expect a letter from her most any day now.

Granny has been on the war path for

[verso page 2]

the last couple days. You know, she keeps her door locked all the time. She says now that us kids ripped one of her dresses. She is going to send us to jail. I’m scared. (Oh Yeah!)

Mother & Mrs. Thomas went to see “How Green Was My Valley”. Ruby has gone out with Ruthie.

These jokes (?) in the paper tonight made me laugh. Maybe you’ll laugh too. I hope so. It feels good to laugh once in a while.

Is it cold in the house

-3-

tonight! It’s usually so hot you can’t breathe & tonight it’s so cold, my goose pimples have goose pimples.

One of the guys Florence works for, is taking his physical examination & probably will be drafted in the near future.

Dunlap & Bain wrote a letter to Morris Magid today. You know—he’s the guy they took to Massillon (state asylum).

As usual, nothing happened today. In fact,

[verso page 3]

less than usual.

My sweet grandmother is bothering me. She certainly can make life miserable.

There isn’t even anything any good on the radio tonight. I didn’t mind having nothing to do when you were here. In fact, I’d much rather spend a quiet evening with you, than to go out & make “whoopee”.

I just looked at your picture. Um! Are you handsome. I certainly am lucky to have such a handsome

-4-

guy to walk down the street with. (When you get back, the first thing I want to do is run my fingers through your hair. XXX.)

I can’t think of much more to say. So,  until tomorrow—

Yours,

Ruth
(The future Mrs. Walter Everett Pittman)

[lipstick kiss]

I love you with all my heart.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.